Posted on Leave a comment

Spreading love & sustainably with Tatoushi Kimono paper

Have you noticed our products come parcelled in a rich heavy paper, and wondered where it’s coming from? 

This is called “Tatoushi”, a kimono storage wrapper made from Japanese Washi paper, which is used to preserve, package and protect kimonos.

The washi paper packaging is made with the utmost care, sometimes you can feel or see herbal flecks on the outside layer – this is to protect the garment from moths and critters attracted to the natural silk packaged inside. Some even use essential oils for extra protection. 

This is how kimonos have been kept in good condition tucked away in our wardrobes for decades without ever being worn again. There are an estimated 800 million kimonos sleeping in the cupboards of modern-day Japanese households and that is why we began REpurpose and REinvent how we honour pre-loved kimonos in our modern daily lifestyle. 

Do you have Kimonos to donate? Or want to get in touch? Connect with us here

What is it made from?

Fibre isn’t just good for your health but also makes for strong paper – pulp such as Kozo (mulberry), gampi or hemp is distributed in the paper mould so the fibres intertwine and pressurise to make for a stronger almost fabric-like material. 

The REC way: REusing Tatoushi to wrap our products

The great thing about paper is that it can be RECycled, UPcyled and REinvented: one of our favourite ways to champion Tatoushi paper is to use it as wrapping paper for our large items, as well as price tags and some stationery products.

And sometimes we use it to craft beautiful origami art that honours traditional Japanese forms.

We have greeting cards that feature Tatoush cranes:

Midori Moss Aloha shirt and matching Tatoushi greeting card

These unique shapes and values are speckled throughout our story as reminders of the philosophy and symbolism behind our Japanese-centric ethos. 

Origami crane to celebrate and bring prosperity to the New Year  :

Setsubun marks the seasonal division when Spring start in Japan where “Mamemaki” (bean throwing) is used to deter evil spirits away:

Origami Heart :

As the season of Valentines approaching and in true REC fashion, we would love to celebrate all kinds of love and connections with you through a heart origami.

Our committment:

We use sustainable kimono packaging as a nod to our roots and further commitment to sustainable practice. REvisiting the way things can be, through upcycling or recycling what you already have, you can now use fabric scraps to make trains of cranes to bring you luck and a way to wind down. 

Tatoushi crane greeting cards

It is the perfect time to evaluate and nurture the different kinds of love you have brought into this new year with. We too have been growing our beloved bespoke collection.

Regardless of what month it is, we believe life is about reaching above and beyond, diving into self-love, discovery and nurturing what connects us to a deeper-rooted love that allows us to REConnect amidst our whirlwind lives every single day. 

#Yoroshiku

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.