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Haikus for Mother’s Day

the tenderness of
spring; unfolding, forgiving
I watch this in you

Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry that consists of brief, non-rhyming lines that elicit natural imagery. Haiku can be written in a number of short verse styles, the most popular of which is a three-line poem with a 5-7-5 syllable sequence. Traditionally, haiku poetry discusses nature themes and imagery describing a particular season or changes in the natural world throughout the year. 

Some key terminology:

  • On (“sounds”): Japanese haikus contain 17 on. 
  • Kigo (a word or phrase that places the haiku in a particular season): for instance, Sakura (“cherry blossoms”) for spring, fuji (“wisteria”) for summer, tsuki (“moon”) for autumn, and samushi (“cold”) for winter.
  • Kireji (the “cutting word”): traditionally, kireji inserts a pause or a break in the poem’s flow, usually to contrast two images.

What are the origins of haiku?

The history of the haiku can be traced back to the 13th century. Originally called “hokku”, haikus were an opening stanza for a larger Japanese poem called rengu, written collaboratively. In the 16th century, poets began writing hokku without the rengu. Matsuo Bashō (1644-94)created haikai, a more relaxed form of rengu, In the 19th century, with the help of Masaoka Shiki (1867-1902), it became known as haiku and recognized as its own form of poetry. 

The history of the haiku can be traced back to the 13th century. Originally called “hokku”, haikus were an opening stanza for a larger Japanese poem called rengu, written collaboratively. In the 16th century, poets began writing hokku without the rengu. Matsuo Bashō (1644-94) created haikai, a more relaxed form of rengu, In the 19th century, with the help of Masaoka Shiki (1867-1902), it became known as haiku and recognized as its own form of poetry. 

Simultaneously, the haiku started to spread to France and to the Netherlands, and then to North America. American Beat poets of the 1950s were profoundly influenced by Eastern philosophy and haiku, as R.H. Blyth’s 1951 book Haiku demonstrates. 

Why are we sharing haikus?

Haikus are a world-renown art form of Japan. In our attempt to empower people from all cultural backgrounds and encourage them to reconnect with their heritage and family history, we are celebrating diversity as well as Mother’s Day. 

Lovingly crafted by our team member Christina Sophie Tring *, our haikus celebrate mothers and the special bond we develop with them throughout our lives. For our founder/designer Yumi, cutting up her mother’s vintage kimonos, which are attached to personal memories turned out to be a form of empowerment, which allowed her to engage in meaningful conversations and strengthen family ties. 4649.REC is not just a sustainable upcycling street wear collection, it attempts to spark that special feeling within people and share it with the world through its clothing pieces and accessories and through workshops, where you too, can learn to upcycle your clothes.

What other aspects of Japanese culture would you like to be celebrated by us? What forms of art from your culture do you feel an attachment to? Connect with us and let’s start our conversation. 

* “A writer with a tendency to look at human fallibility and the emotions that haunt us, Christina Sophie Tring is a poet and prose writer that is focusing on multiple projects this year to build her catalogue of work” 

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